• Macquarie University’s North Ryde campus in Sydney is developing a 25-year infrastructure and capital works program.

file under: Asia/Pacific, Energy, Sustainability, Smart Energy

Macquarie Plans an Energy-Efficient Campus

Macquarie University’s North Ryde campus in Sydney, Australia, is developing a 25-year infrastructure and capital works program that will add 460,000 square meters in gross floor area and accommodate more than 3,000 students. The university’s strategy is to integrate academic and teaching facilities within a broader range of land uses, exploring new ways to look at energy supply and distribution while achieving cost-effective, sustainable campus development. To reach sustainability targets, the university will consider key factors including energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and cost implications.

 
Using the dynamic, integrative and participatory systems modeling process, testing scenarios will compare and measure the effects of capital expenditure, operating expenditure and greenhouse gas emissions.  

CDM Smith and the Institute for Sustainable Futures (University of Technology Sydney) have partnered to deliver the university’s energy supply and distribution strategy. We will apply the urban systems modeling process, developed by CDM Smith’s Neysadurai Centre for Integrated Urban Solutions, to develop and test a range of infrastructure, technology and design scenarios. Using the dynamic, integrative and participatory systems modeling process, testing scenarios will compare and measure the effects of capital expenditure, operating expenditure and greenhouse gas emissions. The analysis will also allow us to test the resilience of design options to energy demand or price shocks.

This analysis links urban development with a range of sustainability options and outcomes, allowing for better decision making in urban design and development. It also helps demonstrate the potential to meet energy needs and sustainability targets through integrated urban design and development in a cost effective way. Currently, the focus is on energy; however, the analysis may also be used to assist Macquarie in achieving their wider sustainability targets.

Macquarie University