file under: Facilities, Energy, Sustainability, North America, United States

CDM Smith Headquarters Awarded LEED Green Building and Energy Star Certifications

Dual achievements underscore the firm’s commitment to sustainability

January 05, 2012

CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts—The CDM Smith world headquarters in Cambridge has earned Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) Gold certification and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ENERGY STAR certification. The certifications recognize the improvements made in energy, lighting, water and material use that benefit building occupants and the broader community.

LEED, established by the U.S. Green Building Council, is the nation’s preeminent program for the design, construction and operation of high-performance green buildings. The ENERGY STAR certification signifies that a building performs in the top 25 percent of similar facilities nationwide for energy efficiency and meets strict energy efficiency performance levels set by the EPA.

Tom Pedersen, CDM Smith senior vice president and director of sustainability, states, “These certifications recognize the achievements of our corporate facilities staff—working with our employees—to improve our sustainability performance for our clients, employees and communities.”

Building performance was improved by strategically managing energy across the entire facility and through the implementation of cost-effective capital investments. Light bulbs and ballasts throughout the building were replaced with more energy-efficient equipment; heating, ventilation and air conditioning, as well as lavatory exhaust fan controls were modified to run more efficiently and only when needed; air conditioning of information technology closets and the elevator machine room was reduced; hot water pumps were fitted with variable speed drives; and an evaporative cooling wastewater meter was installed to abate sewer charges.

“These achievements could not have been realized without the close working partnership of our building owner, Met Life, and our building manager, Lincoln properties,” explains Mark Rogers who managed the LEED project. Charlie Mielcarek, ENERGY STAR project manager, adds, “The support of the Cambridge Energy Alliance and Con Edison over the 3 years of this improvement project was instrumental in gaining these certifications.”

John Manning, CDM Smith President and Chief Operating Officer, says, “Improving the energy efficiency and environmental performance of our headquarters is just one way we are enhancing the quality of life in the communities where we live and work.”

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CDM Smith provides lasting and integrated solutions in water, environment, transportation, energy and facilities to public and private clients worldwide. As a full-service consulting, engineering, construction and operations firm, we deliver exceptional client service, quality results and enduring value across the entire project life cycle.

The Washington, D.C.-based U.S. Green Building Council is committed to a prosperous and sustainable future for our nation through cost-efficient and energy-saving green buildings. With a community comprising 80 local affiliates, more than 18,000 member companies and organizations, and more than 167,000 LEED Professional Credential holders, USGBC is the driving force of an industry that is projected to contribute $554 billion to the U.S. gross domestic product from 2009-2013. For more information, visit www.usgbc.org.

ENERGY STAR was introduced by EPA in 1992 as a voluntary, market-based partnership to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency. Today, the ENERGY STAR label can be found on more than 60 different kinds of products as well as new homes and commercial and industrial buildings that meet strict energy-efficiency specifications set by the EPA. Last year alone, Americans, with the help of ENERGY STAR, saved $18 billion on their energy bills while reducing the greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to those of 34 million vehicles. For more information about ENERGY STAR Certification for Commercial Buildings, visit www.energystar.gov/labeledbuildings.